Many people have preconceived notions about people with cleaning jobs without knowing anything about their lives. The Mirror recently interviewed Ada Rodriguez, a Cuban woman who has cleaned at Fairfield University for the past eight years.

Ada may shatter any preconceptions and stereotypes you have about staff workers at Fairfield.

The Mirror: Do you have any children?

Ada Rodriguez: Yes, 3 boys. I had my first child when I was very young, 17 [years old]. He’s 40 now and he’s a doctor in New Haven. My second boy is a clinical worker and my third boy is a police officer in Stanford.

I work very hard in this country. I never had a good education because I was always working, sometimes two jobs, and I was always watching the kids. I came to this country at 33 [years old] and got my first house five years after. Now I rent out four houses and I have one in Florida. I want to retire in three more years….

TM: What is your everyday routine like, starting from when you wake up?

AR: I wake up at 4 a.m. I start cleaning the little white house in front of the PepsiCo for about two hours. Then I come to Bellarmine and clean for about one and a half hours. Then I go to McCormick and clean for another two hours. I go home at 1:30pm.

TM: When do you feel disrespected by students?

AR: Never. I like the students.

TM: Does this job ever affect the way you view students?

AR: No, no.

TM: Do you think people take you for granted?

AR: No.

TM: Have you ever refused to clean something up? If so, what was it?

AR: I clean everything, I do not refuse. Cleaning is a hard job because I like things very clean. That’s my job, you know?

TM: Overall, would you say that you enjoy your job?

AR: (laughs) I like it.

TM: You can be honest.

AR: I don’t like it because it’s very dirty. But like I said before, it’s my job.

TM: Do you think you should be paid more for what you do?

AR: For the economy now, the pay is okay. I get good insurance and good benefits.

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